Drugs

Jacob H. Huebert wrote:

For most of U.S. history, all drugs were legal. How legal? As libertarian writer Harry Browne put it, “Few people are aware that before World War I, a 9-year-old girl could walk into a drug store and buy heroin.” In fact, before Bayer sold aspirin, it sold Heroin™ as a “sedative for coughs.” (As a German company, Bayer was forced to give up the trademark after World War I under the Treaty of Versailles.) One heroin-laced cough syrup promised in its mail-order catalog: “It will suit the palate of the most exacting adult or the most capricious child.” Cocaine, first manufactured by Merck, was popular, too. Parke-Davis (which is now a subsidiary of Pfizer) advertised a “cocaine kit” that it promised could “supply the place of food, make the coward brave, the silent eloquent and . . . render the sufferer insensitive to pain.” Late-nineteenth century advertisements for “Cocaine Toothache Drops” promised users (including children such as those depicted in the ads) an “instantaneous cure.” Another popular product, “Mrs. Winslow’s Soothing Syrup,” contained one grain (65 mg) of morphine per ounce, and was marketed to mothers to quiet restless infants and children. McCormick (the spice company) and others sold “paregoric,” a mixture of highly concentrated alcohol with opium, as a treatment for diarrhea, coughs, and pain, with instructions on the bottle for infants, children, and adults. Another medication called laudanum was similar, but with 25 times the opium.  Heroin and opium were both marketed as asthma treatments, too. And, of course, cocaine was an ingredient in Coca-Cola from 1886 until 1900

One wonders what change to the constitution was made to allow the horrible situation we endure now. If no change was made, then current laws are unconstitutional. I wonder if anyone has informed the feds of that fact.

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