The use of violence

The non-aggression axiom is central to libertarianism. The essence of libertarianism is that it is wrong to threaten or initiate violence against a person or his property. Force is justified only in self-defense. Murray Rothbard explained:

[Libertarianism] is not and does not pretend to be a complete moral, or aesthetic theory; it is only a political theory, that is, the important subset of moral theory that deals with the proper role of violence in social life. Political theory deals with what is proper or improper for government to do, and government is distinguished from every other group in society as being the institution of organized violence. Libertarianism holds that the only proper role of violence is to defend person and property against violence, that any use of violence that goes beyond such just defense is itself aggressive, unjust, and criminal. Libertarianism, therefore, is a theory which states that everyone should be free of violent invasion, should he free to do as he sees fit except invade the person or property of another. What a person does with his or her life is vital and important, but is simply irrelevant to libertarianism.

Killing someone is the ultimate form of aggression. Especially a helpless, defenseless baby that is guilty of only being born in the middle east. How many babies will the American Empire kill before this is over?

Domestically the empire is ruining lives every day for simply taking a drug that is not approved by the masters. Americans are slaves to their government. It is high time they came to realize that!

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